Some Snow Facts

2 Dec

Alexandra Park the day before it really snowed. That white bit in front is the frozen reservoir.

  • The tops of clouds must be below 0 degrees Celsius/32 degrees Farenheit for snow. 
  • Snow can come from any cloud that is layered.

 

  • Technically, snow is a mineral, like iron and salt.
  • Snow appears white because its crystals act as prisms, breaking up the light of the sun into the entire spectrum of color.  It is actually transparent.

  •  A single snowstorm can drop 40 million tons of snow, carrying the energy equivalent to 120 atom bombs.
  • Most snowflakes are less than one-half inch across. The largest snowflake recorded was fifteen inches in diameter.

 

 

  • The most snow produced in a single snowstorm is 4.8 meters (15.75ft) at Mt Shasta Ski Bowl, California (USA) between 13 and 19 February 1959.
  • It is a fallacy that no two snowflakes are alike (wouldn’t you hate to be the guy given the job of finding that one out?)

  • According to the Guinness Book of World Records, the largest snowflake on record measured 38cm wide and 20cm thick. It was observed in Montana, USA in 1887 and described by witnesses as “larger than a milk pan”.
  • Mt Kilimanjaro in Tanzania is the only permanent snow cap within sight of the equator.

I hate to be the one to say it, but snow is dull.  I Googled ‘interesting facts about snow’ and this is the best I could find.  I wanted to call this post ‘Interesting Facts About Snow’ (why waste a copy & paste?), but I was afraid I’d be prosecuted under the Trades Description Act. 

If you know anything about snow that actually is interesting, please share it with us.

 

21 Responses to “Some Snow Facts”

  1. vivinfrance December 2, 2010 at 14:28 #

    If you think that, Tilly, why is it snowing all over your blog?
    PS In Alaska (I think – somewhere cold, anyway) there are more than 40 words for snow.

    Like

  2. earlybird December 2, 2010 at 16:41 #

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Types_of_snow

    I particularly like ‘snirt’ – very descriptive.

    Like

    • Tilly Bud December 2, 2010 at 21:05 #

      A wonderful word that I have to use soon.

      Thanks for the link – for once, I never thought of Wikipedia.

      Like

  3. Debbie December 2, 2010 at 20:47 #

    Well, I thought it was interesting! But then I knit dishcloths for fun.

    Like

    • Tilly Bud December 2, 2010 at 21:06 #

      I can’t tell you how much your comment made me laugh 🙂 Thanks for the best laugh of the day 🙂

      Like

  4. slpmartin December 2, 2010 at 22:14 #

    And one more fact….it’s cold….and therefore best observed from a ski lodge. 😉

    Like

  5. Musings December 3, 2010 at 07:51 #

    Actually this was quite interesting! You mean I COULD find 2 of the same snow flakes? Too bad I’m in Hawaii.

    Like

    • Tilly Bud December 3, 2010 at 10:18 #

      Wish I was in Hawaii right now! All doors are closed, the central heating is on, I’m wearing four layers of clothes and I’m still cold.

      Like

  6. Mary December 4, 2010 at 00:27 #

    What I know about snow is that there is usually way too much of it once it starts! (And it is going to start HERE tonight.)

    Like

    • Tilly Bud December 5, 2010 at 00:22 #

      But it makes the world so beautiful and so quiet.

      Like

  7. judithatwood January 30, 2012 at 18:05 #

    I live in Maine, and the only thing I have to say about snow is that I’d rather have it here, where we’re prepared to handle it, than somewhere like Washington D.C., where I was stuck in a blizzard for 5 days!

    Like

  8. adinparadise February 7, 2012 at 14:20 #

    I enjoyed your “boring” facts, Tilly. Loved the cartoons too. Yes, I definitely wouldn’t like to have to research the “no two snowflakes alike” claim. It would be a very cold job indeed. 😉

    Like

    • Tilly Bud February 13, 2012 at 13:07 #

      You’ve got to wonder who does this kind of research…because somebody must have.

      Like

  9. colonialist February 13, 2012 at 17:22 #

    Snow is incredibly interesting to people in places where it simply doesn’t happen. Ever. Like here.
    Those facts were, in fact, fascinating! I bet, though, that the guy who found two identical snowflakes would have found some differences if he’d really looked.

    Like

  10. jennysserendipity February 25, 2012 at 18:21 #

    Thanks for liking my post at http://jennysserendipity.wordpress.com/2012/02/04/drew-smith-smoke-and-mirrors/

    Nice Blog!

    Like

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. I Am A Snow Flake « The Laughing Housewife - January 28, 2012

    […] is only 10:44 in the morning and I’ve had 884 hits on an old post, Some Snow Facts.  Over six hundred people found it because they want to know the size of the world’s largest […]

    Like

I welcome your comments but be warned: I'm menopausal and as likely to snarl as smile. Wine or Maltesers are an acceptable bribe; or a compliment about my youthful looks and cheery disposition will do in a pinch.

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