I Am A Snow Flake

28 Jan

Is it snowing in the blogosphere?

Snow in Veria

Image via Wikipedia

It is only 10:44 in the morning and I’ve had 884 hits on an old post, Some Snow Facts.  Over six hundred people found it because they want to know the size of the world’s largest snowflake. 

For the record, it was 15 inches in diameter/38cm wide and 20cm thick.  It was observed in Montana, USA in 1887 and described by witnesses as “larger than a milk pan”. 

What a useless description – how many people use milk pans these days?  If one that size fell today, would we describe it as “half the size of a microwave – a big microwave, that is; about 2/3 of a small microwave, probably, unless you want me to go by the size of the inside, measuring around the glass front.  Does it matter what colour the microwave is?  I got it from IKEA: does that help?”

UPDATE:

As my stats for today are almost at 2000, I Googled ‘World’s Largest Snowflake’.  Guess what?  Google Doodle are celebrating the 125th anniversary of the world’s largest recorded snowflake.

Thanks for mucking up my stats, Google.  Time to give you the cold shoulder.  Consider me an ice maiden.  Who looks like a snowman.

For more Six Word Saturdays, go here.

38 Responses to “I Am A Snow Flake”

  1. Ron. January 28, 2012 at 12:16 #

    Technically speaking, I think that snowflakes that large are referred to as either icebergs or demiglaciers.

    It must be gratifying to be such an authority. I envy you; nobody consults me about anything.

    Like

    • Magical Mystical Teacher January 28, 2012 at 12:48 #

      Here, Ron: I appreciate your insights into snowflakes. I had no idea about that “iceberg” or “demiglacier” stuff! Wow! Now I can impress my students! (Oh, dream on, Teacher, dream on.)

      Like

  2. SammyDee January 28, 2012 at 12:48 #

    Hahaha! Your six word Saturdays are always so much funnier than anything I come up with!

    Like

  3. Piglet in Portugal January 28, 2012 at 13:03 #

    Hmmm I always wondered how big a snowflake is LOL

    Like

  4. Tom (Aquatom1968) January 28, 2012 at 13:23 #

    You’re in cahoots with Google this morning, Tilly, aren’t you? They’re going on about a large snowflake too!
    I use a milkpan. It’s a microwavable milkpan too! It’s not as big as a traditional milkpan though, so considerably smaller than your snowflake.

    Like

  5. Elaine January 28, 2012 at 13:41 #

    I feel quite educated now in the size of snowflakes – thanks Tilly, and Ron – who’d have thought to compare one to the size of a milk pan or iceberg! I hope this comes up at the next quiz night I go to. It could be the comptetion winning answer. 🙂

    Like

  6. Stephanie Michelle Hasty January 28, 2012 at 14:35 #

    no snow here…not sure we’re going to get any…or more like we’ll get some in march.

    Like

    • Tilly Bud January 30, 2012 at 13:05 #

      I used to long for it but the older I get, the less I like it.

      Like

  7. Bridgesburning Chris King January 28, 2012 at 14:41 #

    What a delightful tid bit on flakes! Love it!

    Like

  8. viv blake January 28, 2012 at 14:49 #

    It snowed here last night – at least I think it did, as there was a narrow band of the stuff in the long grass beside our drive. Odd, as I could not see a single flake anywhere else.

    Like

    • Tilly Bud January 30, 2012 at 13:07 #

      Not frost? Sometimes it looks like snow.

      Like

  9. SchmidleysScribbling January 28, 2012 at 14:56 #

    As it happens I have a milk pan. Acutally it is an antique copper milk jug used to collect the milk and bring it into the house. I have not tried measuring snowflakes with it.

    I scoff at records like this. I mean comeon have you ever looked closely at ONE snowflake. They are pretty hard to see without a microscope and they melt fast. You would have to catch it measure it and then let it go so you could record your snowflake size some where.

    Sounds to me as if you have got hold of one of those tall tales that they used to tell out west. Next thing I know you will be writing about a blue ox. Dianne

    Like

    • Tilly Bud January 30, 2012 at 13:08 #

      I don’t know nuthin bout no blue ox. Let me Google it.

      Like

  10. Lorna's Voice January 28, 2012 at 15:11 #

    All I can say is that your post is getting as much attention as the ginormous snowflake. Good for you!

    Like

  11. McGuffyAnn January 28, 2012 at 15:16 #

    Wow! That is one big snowflake! Montana! Well, they do call it “Big Sky Country”!
    Thanks for this flaky post…*lol*!

    Like

  12. nrhatch January 28, 2012 at 15:41 #

    I am often intrigued by the “flurry” of activity on an old post . . . especially when 884 (+/-) visitors don’t leave a single footprint (i.e., comment) behind.

    Like

  13. laurieanichols January 28, 2012 at 15:47 #

    On Thursday we had big snowflakes fall in Blandford but I didn’t have a milk pan and I didn’t want to haul out my microwave but I promise you that they were big.

    Like

  14. Brenda January 28, 2012 at 15:52 #

    so what is a milk pan anyway?

    Like

    • Tilly Bud January 30, 2012 at 13:10 #

      A pan in which to boil milk, in ye olden days. You know: yore.

      Like

  15. Jim January 28, 2012 at 16:55 #

    Hi Till ~~ It’s been several years sinice I’ve seen snow, let alone snow flakes. I am thinking in Iowa, U.S, three years ago.

    The biggest hailstone I have ever found was saucer sized. That was among those on the ground after a tornado in Nebraska. We kids were at school in the cave until it passed. Our school was intact.

    One last thing about the hailstone, when it melted (I kept it like a butterfly in a jar) there was a clock gear inside.

    Happy 6WS!:)
    ..

    Like

    • Tilly Bud January 30, 2012 at 13:11 #

      You know, the most fascinating part of that comment was not the hail or even the tornado, but the cave. Do tell.

      Like

  16. rumpydog January 28, 2012 at 17:06 #

    Oh Dog! That was a big old snowflake. woo woo woo!

    Like

  17. Linda January 28, 2012 at 18:46 #

    Maybe that tidbit of info will be a question on Millionaire one of these days! (:>)

    Happy Saturday!

    Like

    • Tilly Bud January 30, 2012 at 13:12 #

      Locking it away now, for future use 🙂

      Like

  18. musings January 28, 2012 at 19:55 #

    No snow over here in Hawaii except on Mauna Kea (volcano). I have no idea what a milk pan is. I know what a milk can is, but not a pan.

    Like

    • Tilly Bud January 30, 2012 at 13:14 #

      A very small pan for the stove; small enough to heat a cup full of milk quickly.

      Like

  19. Karen S. January 28, 2012 at 22:58 #

    Check out google I think they said it’s the world’s largest snowflake day or something like that! I have to go check it out….myself!

    Like

  20. soulbrush January 29, 2012 at 00:23 #

    what a fun post, loooks brr chilly- here in merry ole London, it is still like Autumn!

    Like

    • Tilly Bud January 30, 2012 at 13:18 #

      I think that’s Canada or somewhere; nowhere I know!

      Like

  21. artjen1971 January 29, 2012 at 12:43 #

    Sounds to me like someone measured the splat of a snowball on the side of their barn on the way out to get the milk for the milkpan. I have news for these oldfashioned exaggeraters–that’s not a snowflake! Silly 19th century Montanians! 🙂

    Fun post!

    Like

  22. eof737 January 30, 2012 at 05:37 #

    Pity I missed that one… Snowflakes or not I’ll take the visits. Enjoy it Tilly. 🙂

    Like

  23. Rosemary Nissen-Wade aka SnakyPoet January 30, 2012 at 22:54 #

    Oh, you’re so funny! As well as informative. Thanks for a good start to my day! (And, as a hater of the cold, I am glad I live nowhere near snow.)

    Like

  24. Joseph January 31, 2012 at 01:28 #

    Lol! Google I think amped up my results when I made a post thanking them about letting us reply to post. It’s so hot!! in Houston, wish it were snowing….. but, oh well. : )

    Like

I welcome your comments but be warned: I'm menopausal and as likely to snarl as smile. Wine or Maltesers are an acceptable bribe; or a compliment about my youthful looks and cheery disposition will do in a pinch.

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